Category Archive for: Trade

Six Questions African Policymakers Must Answer Now

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Originally published 3/14/16 By Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala The “Africa rising” story of the past decade, fuelled by 5 percent average annual growth, is in danger of faltering, due to the impact of global uncertainty, depressed commodity prices, and weakly performing economies like China. Don’t be lulled by the IMF’s 2016 forecast: yes 4 percent growth with…



International E-Commerce in Africa

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  • Posted on August 19, 2016

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  • Trade

E-commerce has great potential to become a significant part of the economic activity of countries throughout Africa. Increasing digital literacy and unprecedented new demand are occurring at the same time as breakthrough developments in infrastructure and technology.



Experts weigh Brexit’s implications for Africa

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  • Posted on August 19, 2016

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  • Politics / Trade

Some experts consider that “Brexit” could have adverse impacts on African economies, in terms of the type of preference schemes the UK may grant, knock-on trade and investment impacts of economic slowdown and tumbling British pound, as well as potential changes in EU policies in light of London’s role in the formulation of international development policy…



Can Africa Move Away From Aid To Trade?

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  • Posted on August 2, 2016

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  • Trade

What should it do to attract more private equity and how can it convert the illicit financial flows to funds for domestic resource mobilization, climate change and conflict resolution – these are pertinent issues which affect the long term development of the African economies.



AGOA: A brief background

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  • Posted on June 13, 2016

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  • Politics / Trade

The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) is a legislation that was signed into law by the U.S. Congress in May 2000. The Act is designed to offer “tangible incentives for African countries to continue their efforts to open their economies and build free markets.”



TTIP will not only impact people in the EU and the US, but Africa stands to lose too

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The on-going Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) negotiations between the U.S. and the European Union are fast becoming a primary concern of NIAS. While it is the case that TTIP has generated a great deal of commentary about its very serious implications for Western democracy, human rights, food safety, public services and environmental protection,…